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Tuesday, May 13

  1. page home edited ... Invisible Man AP Literature Review [[AP_Review| {NYSCATE_Wiki.key} ]]
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    Invisible Man
    AP Literature Review
    [[AP_Review| {NYSCATE_Wiki.key} ]]
    (view changes)
    3:30 pm
  2. page home edited ... Invisible Man AP Literature Review [[AP_Review| {NYSCATE_Wiki.key} ]]
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    Invisible Man
    AP Literature Review
    [[AP_Review| {NYSCATE_Wiki.key} ]]
    (view changes)
    10:25 am
  3. file NYSCATE_Wiki.key uploaded
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Monday, May 12

  1. page Invisible_Man edited ... PLEASE NOTE: You must be diligent about citing ALL of your sources (both textual and multimedi…
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    PLEASE NOTE: You must be diligent about citing ALL of your sources (both textual and multimedia) both within your wiki and in the Works Cited section. If you have 7 sources listed in your Works Cited section, then I expect to see each of those 7 sources cited within the body of your wikispace (which pieces of information came from each source) and vice versa. If you do not accurately cite your sources within your wikispace, you will be penalized according to the English Department's Plagiarism Policy.
    The Great Depression and its Influence on the Invisible Man
    Cara Moreau
    Relate the conditions of the Great Depression to the social, political, and economic aspects depicted throughout Invisible Man. (The Brotherhood is an example of a communist organization which were similar to the groups prevalent throughout the 1930's. They were looking to improve the conditions of their lives.)
    Literary Allusions within Invisible Man (importance of themes such as blindness)
    Rick C.
    Will examine references made to famous works such as The Odyssey.
    The color references within the novel (black, white and gray)
    Danielle Portnoy, Lara Kozin, Evan Flach
    We will analyze the sybolism and significance of when these three colors are brought up in the novel.
    The invisible man being a traitor in the "white man's society"
    Tessa Millman and Samantha Stern
    Relates to the Grandfather's dying words in the first chapter where he states that he was a traitor to enemy lines, and he wants his grandchildren to overcome the "enemy."
    Color Symbolism
    Kateryna H
    Jazz
    Alyssa Norwin, Melissa Sackler & Sasha Clynes
    How jazz is portrayed in the novel and how it relates to the plot of the novel as well as its structure.
    Sex and the Degradation of Women
    Amelia Di Stefano, Sonali Tatapudy, and Heather Collins
    Relates to the use of sex/exploitation of women in The Invisible Man and its intended effects of power, fear, and control and examines the historical context of sex and the role of women with regard to sex/virginity/rape in 1930's and 40's American society.
    The use of the 'wise fool' as an archetype
    Jamie Greenwood, Emma Pelosi, and Danielle Rubin
    Explores the use of the crazy man or the fool as a means of prophetic speech, as a means of telling a truth other, more sane characters refuse to believe, acknowledge, or are too ignorant to know. We are going to look at three main characters in the invisible man - The Vet, Ras The Exhorter/Destroyer, and the grandfather - and see how this archetype is used in the Invisible Man. We are then going to explore the origin of the archetype and reflect upon how it is used in other works of literature.
    The Invisible Man's growth through his speeches
    Brittany Schwartz, Marti Kaldany
    Shows how he has grown from his graduation speech through the rest of the novel including the eviction and Brotherhood speeches.
    Historical Blacks and Their Roles in/Influence on the Invisible Man
    Jason Stack, Matt Shore, and Lindsay Stiller
    The mentions of historical black figures (Booker T. Washington, Frederick Douglass, and Marcus Garvey) in the novel, how they affect the life and attitude of the Invisible Man, and their references at certain times through the novel.
    Leadership, Ideology and Thought: A Closer Look at the Movers and Shakers Behind the African American Struggle for Progress
    Brian Fleischer, Ben Karlin, Dan Schwartz
    An analysis of the philosophical rifts within the American Civil Rights Movement. We will outline the disparaties between the various visions of "progress" that IM encounters in the novel and trace their historical foundings while focusing on the specific organizations that professed these views and the leaders that organized them. Cake will be served. The revolution will not be televised. Red rover, red rover. Leave the gun, take the canoli and brace yourselves for a metaphorical quest through a sea of intolerance and bigotry to to the mountains of social justice and the white whales and harpoons, conch shells and other literary symbols that have made the common denominator of maturity significantly lower in classrooms nationwide.
    Dream Analysis in Invisible Man
    Marissa Beldock, David Niederhoffer, and Jacob Wolfson
    A look into the role and significance of dreams throughout Invisible Man based on Freudian and Jungian theories.
    The significance behind the senses
    Chelsea B, Brianne S, Youstina G
    Refers to the acknowledgment of sounds, sights, feelings, smells etc. in the Invisible Man and how it affects the Invisible Man, the Brotherhood and of course society in general. We hope to tie in historical references such as the impact of sound a.k.a. jazz music in movements or the impact of one’s appearance (sight) in judgment or molding of history and society within the book.
    Analysis of the Diction of Key Characters
    Dan Furman, Anna Grun
    This topic will explain why the author makes each character speak the way they do and why its important to their contirbution to the main idea of the story. For each character we will pick out one or two key quotes, analyze the diction and syntax, and say how it relates to the novel.
    Significance of death and rebirth in the novel
    Michelle Baker, Rebeccah Stevens
    Our topic compares the death of different characters, from the Grandpa in the first chapter to Clifton. Furthermore, we will discuss the Invisible Man's attitude towards death and relate it to his opinions on the value of a person.
    Family
    Matt Bernstein, Seth Litwack, and Nick Favia
    Our topic will explore the role that the Invisible Man's family plays in the story. We will also talk about the attitude that he has towards his family.
    Significance of The Invisible Man not having a name
    Andrew Lowden, Billy Ivers, Erik Hoempler
    Our topic will analyze why the invisible man is not given a name throughout the novel. We will also provide commentary on how this affects the work as a whole. As an added bonus we will find other literary works whose protagonist isn't named.
    Reflection of the Time Period in which the novel takes place
    Lou Goldstein, Jessi Steinberg, and Jenna Schaffer
    We will discuss the Harlem Renaissance, and the ways that it shapes the attitude of the novel as well as creates a unique atmosphere. In addition to this, we will reflect on topics such as post-war life, which affected the lifestyle and philosophy of many. For each topic we discuss, we will show how the setting contributes to factors such as the structure, tone, and environment that shape the novel.
    Religious Undertones
    Samantha Schles and Amy Cohen
    We'll look at the various encounters with religion and relgious characters, such as the Founder, and the IM's relation to and perceptions of said incidents and people.
    Existentialism in Invisible Man: The influence of absurdist thought (Camus, Sartre...)
    Sam Spokony
    Keepin' It Real

    How Racism Prevents the Invisible Man from Attaining Goals and his Identity
    Staci Faye, Tina Pavliak
    Basically we will look at what is holding the racstsacts that hinder the Invisible Man in his quest for uniqueness

    (view changes)
    5:12 pm
  2. page Pride_and_Prejudice edited ... Click on the following links for information, research, and analysis related to the novel. • …
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    Click on the following links for information, research, and analysis related to the novel.
    • Education in the Victorian Era
    (by Evan Flach and Brian Fleischer)
    • Marriage in the Victorian Era
    (by Alyssa Norwin, Melissa Sackler and Anna Grun)
    • Social Hierarchy in the Victorian Era
    (by Sasha Clynes, Martina Kaldany and Brittany Schwartz)
    • Gender Roles in the Victorian Era
    (by Marissa Beldock, Ellen Ben and Samantha Ben)
    • Social Customs & Mores in the Victorian Era {pride_cover.jpg}
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    Victorian Ball (by Sonali Tatapudy, Danielle Rubin and Kateryna Hlynchuk)
    The Victorian
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    Part II (by Dan Furman, Billy Ivers and Lou Goldstein)
    Courtship

    Courtship
    and Dating (by Emma Pelosi and David Niederhoffer)
    Dining Etiquette (by Jason Stack and Sam Spokony)
    • Transportation in the Victorian Era
    (by Samantha Stern, Lara Kozin and Danielle Portnoy)
    • Fashion in the Victorian Era
    (by Jessi Steinberg and Jenna Schaffer)
    • Music in the Victorian Era
    (by Rebeccah Stevens and Jamie Greenwood)
    Historical Context
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    Pride & Prejudice
    (by Amelia Di Stefano and Michelle Baker)
    Prejudic
    • Victorian Philosophy & Worldview
    (by Dan Schwartz, Erik Hoempler and Andrew Lowden) {pride.jpg}
    • Victorian Architecture
    (by Matt Bernstein, Ben Karlin and Seth Litwack)
    • Victorian Real Estate
    (by Matt Shore, Lindsay Stiller and Nick Favia)
    • Pride & Prejudice as a Novel of Manners
    (by Tina Pavliak, Heather Collins and Rick Cocchieri)
    • The Role of Letters & Correspondence in Pride and Prejudice
    (by Chelsea Bellmund, Tessa Millman and Staci Faye)
    • Who is Jane Austen in the Novel?
    (by Youstina Guirguis, Brianne Stiso and Jacob Wolfson)
    • Pride & Prejudice: On the page and screen
    (by Samantha Schles and Amy Cohen)
    (view changes)
    5:04 pm

Thursday, May 8

  1. page home edited ... Click on the links below to view our work to date. Pride and Prejudice Frankenstein Invi…
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    Click on the links below to view our work to date.
    Pride and Prejudice
    Frankenstein
    Invisible Man
    AP Literature Review
    (view changes)
    8:54 am

Tuesday, April 29

  1. msg heey emma message posted heey emma kk! everything looks great :)
    heey emma
    kk! everything looks great :)
    5:38 am
  2. page hamlet_review_2 edited ... Laertes: The son of Polonius and Ophelia's brother. Laertes blames the death of both Polonius …
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    Laertes: The son of Polonius and Ophelia's brother. Laertes blames the death of both Polonius and Opehelia on Hamlet and therefore wants revenge on Hamlet. He eventually gains his revenge by wounding Hamlet with his blade, which was poisoned by Claudius, but dies when Hamlet stabs him with the same blade.
    Ophelia: The daughter of Polonius and the sister to Laertes. Ophelia is a young and beautiful woman who finds herself in a relationship with Hamlet. However, when Hamlet transforms his personality, she becomes overwhelmed and shocked by his moods. As one who will listen to whatever he father says, she agrees to spy on Hamlet when he is considered to have gone mad. Ophelia herself becomes mad after the death of her father and she eventually dies by drowning.
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    named Fortinbras). Fortinbras'sFortinbra {http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/3159417.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=5BCEFAA07678B603AD9E30870410286EA55A1E4F32AD3138} s's revenge upon
    The Ghost: The ghost of Hamlet's father appears in Act One and he tells his story of how he was killed and who killed him. This sparks Hamlet's impulsiveness to kill Claudius.
    Gertrude: She is the Queen of Denmark and Hamlet's mother. Shortly after her husband's death, she marries Claudius. Although she loves Hamlet dearly, she ignores his strong opposition to the marriage. As a character, she is more concerned with her wealth and status than moral views. She dies when she drinks from a cup in which Claudius has put poison.
    (view changes)
    2:33 am
  3. page hamlet_review_2 edited ... “What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty, in form and movi…
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    “What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god—the beauty of the world, the paragon of animals” Act II, Scene 2.
    This quote connects to the main idea of Humanism, and shows the idea of the era, that man was a creature unlike any other. Shakespeare's praise of mankind seems to coincide with the personalities of various characters in Hamlet. The infinite faculties of reason are clearly visible in Hamlet, and the aspect of action is present in Fortinbras. (See Literary Movement for a deeper explanation)
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    is woman!" Act I, Scene 2
    When analyzing the women in Hamlet, the connecting idea seems to be their frailty, and the ease in which they fall subject to circumstances. The Queen is easily wooed by her own brother-in-law, and cannot see his guilt and the hand he played in killing her husband. This frailty leads to their incestuous relationship, and is one of the underlying causes beneath Hamlet's madness. Ophelia, upon discovering Hamlet's apparent madness and her father's death, is unable to carry the burden, and drowns herself, once again showing the frailty of women.
    "This above all: to thine own self be true." Act I, Scene 3
    This quote shows Shakespeare's belief that ultimately, each one of us will fulfill the duties that our nature will allow us to fulfill. Each character in Hamlet performs his/her duty according to his/her ability and nature, and is thus true to themselves. Hamlet follows his tendency to overthink; Claudius kills his brother in order to be true to his own desires; the Queen remarries hastily to be true to her own needs, whether sexual or emotional; Fortinbras follows his action-oriented nature after his fathers' death, and so on.

    Pivotal Scenes
    Hamlet sees the ghost of his father
    (view changes)
    2:30 am
  4. page hamlet_review_2 edited ... Key Quotations "To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether (Whether 'tis nob…
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    Key Quotations
    "To be, or not to be: that is the question:
    Whether(Whether 'tis nobler
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
    ...
    opposing end them?them?)" Act III, Scene 1
    This quotes contains the key to the central conflict within Hamlet, as it explains that Hamlet's main decision is that between planning revenge and actually taking action. It is apparent in Fortinbras that rash action without planning is illogical, but the character of Hamlet makes it evident that extensive planning without action is also illogical. It seems to be Laertes's middle path that leads to the desired outcome. (See Central Conflict for a deeper explanation)
    “What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god—the beauty of the world, the paragon of animals” Act II, Scene 2.
    This quote connects to the main idea of Humanism, and shows the idea of the era, that man was a creature unlike any other. Shakespeare's praise of mankind seems to coincide with the personalities of various characters in Hamlet. The infinite faculties of reason are clearly visible in Hamlet, and the aspect of action is present in Fortinbras. (See Literary Movement for a deeper explanation)
    "Frailty, thy name is woman!"
    When analyzing the women in Hamlet, the connecting idea seems to be their frailty, and the ease in which they fall subject to circumstances. The Queen is easily wooed by her own brother-in-law, and cannot see his guilt and the hand he played in killing her husband. This frailty leads to their incestuous relationship, and is one of the underlying causes beneath Hamlet's madness. Ophelia, upon discovering Hamlet's apparent madness and her father's death, is unable to carry the burden, and drowns herself, once again showing the frailty of women.

    Pivotal Scenes
    Hamlet sees the ghost of his father
    (view changes)
    2:20 am

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